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Vermont Weathervane

CELEBRATE THE SEASON:
Talking Turkey
by Mary Lou Healy

Eleventh-Month Secrets
by Haydn S. Pearson

Pico Mountain
Killington's Seventh Heaven

First Tracks at Stratton Mountain

IN THE FARMHOUSE KITCHEN:
Savory Side Dishes
For Your Thanksgiving Feast

VERMONT VERSES
Remains
by Wayne Kelley

EVERYTHING WOOD HEAT:
What's Wrong with My Woodstove?
by Daryle Thomas

VERMONT BY HAND:
Painting With Wood
by Kirt Zimmer

DO IT YOURSELF CRAFTS:
Make A Gift Basket
Just in Time for the Holidays

INTO THE OUTDOORS:
Hunting: The Last Opening Day
by Mike Williams

Hunting Records and Information
Including Deer and Moose Hunting Season

Roadside Visions
by Heather Behrens

A Prickly Subject
by Heather Behrens

VERMONT WEATHERVANE BOOK NEWS:
Spanning Time: Vermont's Covered Bridges

Perfumes, Splashes & Colognes
Guide to making fragrances at home

GET OUT AND ABOUT:
Vermont Country Calendar
Statewide Calendar of Events

Blue Ribbon Events
Detailed information on selected Vermont events

EXPLORE OUR OTHER SEASONS:
FALL
WINTER
SPRING
SUMMER


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or call: 802-645-9631
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Vermont Weathervane

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100 Moose Taken
in 4-Day Vermont Season

Vermont's 1997 four-day October moose hunt was highly successful with 100 moose taken, according to the Fish & Wildlife Department.

"The 1997 moose hunt was successful in every way," said Fish & Wildlife Commissioner Allen Elser.

"This was the state's fifth moose hunt in modern times conducted under Vermont's Moose Management Plan with hunters safely removing enough moose to help keep the moose population stable in the Northeast Kingdom."

Moose hunting permits were issued by lottery to 165 hunters this year, up from 100 the year before.

Last year, hunters took 78 moose.

Vermont's moose population is estimated at about 2,100 animals, most of them concentrated in Essex, Orleans and Caledonia Counties.

Moose, however, are well-established in other state regions, including Chittenden and Washington Counties.

"Vermont's moose hunts have been conducted according to a Moose Management Plan created with public input and consensus," said Rop Regan, wildlife division director.

"We are doing a new ten-year plan now. Bioiogical data and public consensus indicate that hunting will continue to be a moose herd management tool in the next plan," added Regan.


Island Pond Hunter Takes New Rocord Archery Deer
Ted Firestine of Island Pond, Vt. shot the heaviest buck ever taken in Vermont by bow and arrow on October 16, 1997 while hunting in the Northeast Kingdom Town of Charleston.

The eight-point buck dressed out at 253 pounds. Firestine shot the buck at 25 yards while hunting from a tree stand that was about 150 yards back in the woods from an agricultural field.

"I saw the buck walking," Firestine said. "Then he stopped, looking behind him at other deer that were coming. This gave me a perfect shot." Firestine has taken eight other deer in his 22 years of bow hunting.

Previously, the heaviest Vermont buck taken with a bow weighed 240 pounds and was taken by James LeBlanc in Jay on October 5, 1993.


Hunters Urged to Respect Landowners

Hunters should show appreciation for the hospitality of Vermont landowners, according to the Fish & Wildlife Department.

"Vermont hunters are fortunate to enjoy relatively easy access to private lands throughout the state," says Vermont Fish & Wildlife Cornmissioner Allen Elser. "Considering that 89 percent of the state is in private ownership, we really owe those landowners a lot of appreciation, and we can show it in several ways."

"If you can figure out who owns the land, ask for permission to hunt," says Elser. "Most landowners appreciate knowing who is on their property." It's also good to ask-if there is a preferred place for you to park your vehicle.

"When the season is over, a thoughtful, 'Thank You,' will show that you really appreciated the opportunity to hunt," adds Elser.

Elser also recommends hunters pick up any litter they see, even though it may be someone else's.